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Spelling Out The Benefits Of Bicycling

Spelling Out the Benefits of Bicycling

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Bike Month is a reminder of cycling’s healthy benefits and the importance of always wearing a helmet

Pedal-powered biking is good for your body, good for your mind, good for the earth — and it’s just plain fun,

Infographic on helmet safety (PDF)

May is National Bike Month, and a great time to celebrate the many benefits of safely riding around on two wheels.

Whether you are bicycling to school, work, or just around town, safety is paramount.

  • Always wear a bike helmet.
  • Help young ones develop the essential habit of wearing a bike helmet every time they ride a bike. Provide assistance and encouragement.
  • Safety starts with leading by example. Model good behavior and always wear a helmet yourself, no matter how short a distance or how close to home you are riding. Children need to see grown-ups wearing bike helmets.
  • Learn about bike safety, including the proper way to fit a helmet and how to perform a safety check to ensure your bike is operating the way it should.

 

A healthy cycle

Hold on to your handlebars. Here’s a letter-by-letter list of bicycling benefits for you and your community:

BBurns calories. Saddling up to ride to school or work can help you lose weight, maintain a healthy weight, and keep your bones and muscles strong.

I Inspires others around you. There are many ways to be active. Biking is one way to be a leader and show others that you support an active lifestyle — and that you wear your bike helmet.

C Cuts down on expenses. Bicycling saves money. Rather than spending money on fuel to drive to school or to run errands, time can be spent riding your bicycle.

Y You can participate in Bike to School Day. National Bike Month includes a variety of events where you can get involved and bike to school or work.

C Congestion is decreased. Each bike is one less car on the road.

L Lowers risks for serious health problems. Staying active helps you focus and gives you more energy. Regular exercise can reduce stress, lower your blood pressure and prevent disease.

I Incorporates regular physical activity. Everyone should aim for 30 minutes of activity each day. Children should be getting 60 minutes a day. Getting exercise through biking and even during your regular commute is an easy way to ensure you are staying active.

N New way to make friends. Biking builds community and you can get to know others who share a passion for healthy commuting. A good riding buddy can help you stay motivated.

G Good fun. Devoting time to being outside, getting daily physical activity and breezing around on a bicycle is energizing and can be something to looking forward to each day.

This Post Has 3 Comments
  1. Riding a bike sounds like a lot of fun. I like the fact that it can save me money, since it’s free to ride! Plus, it’d save me time, since I wouldn’t have to park it. Parking my car at school can be terrible.

  2. My brother is thinking of buying a bicycle to ride to and from school every day and I am glad that I found this article because I did not know that there are so many benefits to biking. You make a great point that biking saves money because you will spend less money on gas and you will also decrease the congestion of cars on the road. Also, the fact that you can make new friends in the biking community will be a big benefit for my brother because he loves meeting new people.

  3. It’s a healthy mode of transportation: Biking is a completely green form of transportation that’s free (so long as you have a bike) and provides some great exercise to boot. Instead of slouching in front of the steering wheel cursing rush hour traffic, biking to work adds an additional calorie burn to your daily or occasional routine.
    Helps fight depression: Mental health conditions such as depression, stress and anxiety can be reduced by regular bike riding. This is due to the effects of the exercise itself and because of the enjoyment that riding a bike can bring.

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Greg Crump

Greg Crump is a senior communications consultant for Kaiser Permanente and the father of two school-aged children. He has more than a decade of experience working with nonprofits, community organizations and local government.

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